Posts tagged ‘Smith family’

January 4, 2013

Feature Friday: The Life and Times of C. J. Crunkleton

I keep waiting for someone to ask me why I included all the local and regional news in my book on Rabun County’s earliest newspapers, instead of only the obituaries and death notices as many compilers do.

No one’s asked, but I think it’s an important question, and my answer is this: Newspapers are, in and of themselves, an important resource outside of the fact that they can serve as a substitute for vital and court records. To demonstrate this, let’s look at excerpts from early issues of The Clayton Tribune and The Tallulah Falls Spray pertaining to a gentleman named C. J. Crunkleton.

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November 16, 2012

Friend of Friends Friday: Three Oglethorpe Co., GA, Slave Importation Affidavits

While doing research for an upcoming book abstracting slave importation affidavit registers for several Georgia counties, I found the following loose affidavits, each found in Oglethorpe County, Georgia’s microfilmed loose papers.

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October 3, 2012

John Harvey Derrick Asks to Be Apprenticed to Saml. R. Lambert, Macon Co., NC

While this record holds wonderful information about John Harvey Derrick, including his date of birth, I wish he had named his allegedly deceased parents!

Minutes of Saturday 28 March 1840…

John Harvey Derrick came into Court alledging that
he is without father or mother living & asking the Court
to bind him to the Tailoring business under Saml. R. Lambert
under the following conditions, that the Sd. Lambert takes
the said Derrick until he arrives at the age of twenty one
years being sixteen on the 14th April next, as an indented
apprentice, that in considerations of the labour & services of
said youth (not to be subject to laborious farming work) the
said Lambert agrees to give the said Apprentice nine
months schooling in a reputable English school, find
him in good & suitable Clothes & Boarding, and teach &
instruct him in all the art & Mystery of the Tailoring
business in its various departments & at the expiration
of said apprenticeship to furnish him with a neat &
new suit of Jeans Clothing Hat shoes &c- the following Justices being
present, viz Johnathan Philips, Jacob Siler, Saul
Smith, & John Wild, John Howard

Source: Macon County, North Carolina, County Court Minutes Book 3, 1838 – 1855: 89; North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh; NCSA micropublication C.061 30001.

October 1, 2012

Three Generations of Smiths in One Record, Macon Co., NC

My recent lecture on researching the poor focused on Georgia records, but truthfully, many of the records I used as examples can also be found in other states, albeit in different forms. Here is one example of a court record establishing support for an illegitimate child. Note that this one record names the child and her age, both her parents, and her grandfather.

Minutes of Monday Jan. 20th 1840

State & Elizabeth Smith vs Larken Johnson } Bastardy

Ordered by Court that Larkin Johnson pay the sum
of sixty Dollars for the maintenance of Elizabeth Smiths
bastard Child of which he stands convicted as the reputed
father as appears of records and that Sci-fa issue to
him to appear at next Court & show Cause if any he
have why Exceution [sic] should not issue for the same

Barbary Smith the infant Bastard Child of Elizabeth
Smith be bound to Joseph Smith the Grandfather till she
attain the age of 18 now being two years old

Sci fa issued 16 May 1840

Source: Macon County, North Carolina, County Court Minutes Book 3, 1838 – 1855: 67; North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh; NCSA micropublication C.061 30001.

March 23, 2012

Feature Friday: Two Marriages from the Franklin Observer, 16 March 1860

The following two marriages were extracted from The Franklin Observer, published in Macon Co., NC, and edited by C. D. Smith and L. F. Siler. Only two issues of The Observer are known to be extant: the March 16, 1860 issue, held at the Duke University Library in Durham; and the June 22, 1860 issue, held at the University of North Carolina Library at Chapel Hill.

Both marriages were taken from the March 16, 1860 issue (Vol. 1, No. 34). The first marriage deals with the first licensed marriage among the Cherokee East.

Married, On the Raven Fork of Oconalufta, in Jackson county, on the 17th of February, by Rev. W. W. Smith, John Ool-stoo-ih to Gin-she, grand-daughter of Standing Wolf. The ceremony was interpreted to the parties by Jefferson Hornbuckle.

This marriage may be worth of note from the fact that it is the first licensed marriage that has ever been solemnized among the Cherokees East. Under an Ordinance passed some months since, by a full council of the nation, a marriage to be made legal, must be licensed by a native Clerk, appointed for that purpose. This is the first marriage under it. The same ordinance abolished bigamy.

The second marriage was a little more run of the mill.

[Married] On the 11th of March, 1860, by M. Rhodes, Esq., Mr. Jackson Frady to Miss Caroline Scroggs, all of Macon county.

I apologize for not including page and column numbers. I transcribed the two issues for inclusion in a genealogical society publication, but the editor and I could not agree on terms. (He wanted me to place the surnames in all caps. I refused, politely.)

These issues are available on microfilm, for those interested.

September 22, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday: John and Jane Shook

John and Jane Shook, Shook Cemetery, Rabun Co., GA

Shook
John Jane
Nicholson Shook
Deadas | Alexander
William | Margaret
Mary | Martha
Caroline | Rebecca
Angeline | Fate
Sarah | John
Nancy | Mack
Elizabeth | Manda Ree

Taken at Shook Cemetery, Rabun Co., GA. The original stones still mark the burial sites. One of the stones near the large, new stone has some writing scratched into it, but we were unable to decipher it.

John Shook’s death date, at least, is recorded in court minutes. During the January Term, 1888, of the Court of Ordinary, Rabun Co., GA, Alexander A. Shook brought evidence that “on the 9th day of January 1888 John Shook of Said county departed this life”. The heirs at law of the deceased “are fourteen in number” and were listed as Alexander A. Shook, Rebecka Elliot, Mary Smith, Elizabeth Eller, John Shook, Nancy Singleton, Sara Crag, Margaret King, Amanda Baker, Martha Baker, William Shook, John Shook, Jr., James Shook, and Demarious Tanner.1

As Jane wasn’t mentioned as an heir in the above minutes, she had most likely predeceased her husband. She was still living in 1880 when she and John were enumerated on the 1880 US Census in the household of their son-in-law and daughter, Albert and Sarah Cragg. Also enumerated was nine-year old Dorah Smith, listed as Albert’s “nice”;2 she was possibly the daughter of Sarah’s sister, Mary.

Additional information on Jane’s date of death may be contained in the records created by the probate of her husband’s estate.

_____
1. Minutes, Court of Ordinary, Rabun Co., 1887 – 1898: 13. Probate Judge’s Office, County Courthouse, Clayton, Georgia.
2. Albert Cragg household, 1880 U.S. Census, Rabun County, Georgia, population schedule, Tallulah District No. 509, Enumeration District 172, Supervisor’s District 1, sheet 9, dwelling 74, family 75. Taken from: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration micropublication T9, roll 162.

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