Posts tagged ‘Rabun County Georgia’

January 28, 2014

Rabun County’s Weather, January 1899

We’re having a snow day today here at home. Interestingly enough, the weatherman predicted no snow for northern Georgia; yet, there it is: three inches of snow, and more coming down by the second.

Just for fun, I thought I’d post some excerpts from The Clayton Tribune‘s community columns for January 1899. All were taken from my published transcription of Rabun County’s early newspapers, Rabun County, Georgia, Newspapers, 1894 – 1899.

6 January 1899 issue:

Tiger: “We are having some very cold weather.”

Warwoman: “According to the ruling days the weather will be very favorable for out door labor up to June.”

If you’re wondering what “ruling days” is, the old-timers believed the first twelve days of January corresponded respectively to the twelve months of the year, weather-wise.

13 January 1899 issue:

Warwoman: “We are experiencing a cold snap at present, hope the weather will moderate soon and we may have a pleasant January.”

Bridge Creek: “The weather is very cold and unsettled now.”

20 January 1899 issue:

Upper Tiger: “We are having some more disagreeable weather and the roads are muddy. The overseers are trying to have them worked so that Judge Estes will not grumble when he attends court next month.”

North Chechero: “It is the muddiest time now we have had in quite a time. W. L. Carver arrived home last Friday and reports more mud and it in larger pieces.”

26 January 1899 issue:

Bridge Creek: “Mud and rainy weather seems to be plentiful.”

North Chechero: “I am glad to see nice weather again. The roads are drying out some.”

Vandiver [column] 1: “Rain and mud, no end to the mud.”

Vandiver [column] 2: “We are very proud of the beautiful weather and if it remains fair I think we will have less mud.”

So it seems that no matter what the era, people are always interested in the weather and either complaining because it’s bad or joyful because it’s not. Plus ça change…

August 6, 2013

Now Available: Rabun County, Georgia, Writs, 1836 – 1859

I’m very pleased to announce the release of my newest book-length project, Rabun County, Georgia, Writs, 1836 – 1859. This book covers early Superior and Inferior Court records that have never before been published, and that are not microfilmed. The only way to access these records is by viewing the originals, which are located in the Clerk of the Superior Court’s office in Clayton.

In spite of the title (which was taken from the titles of the original bound record volumes), this publication includes many different kinds of court records, including: complaints or petitions, affidavits, acknowledgments of service, executions of writs, receipts, confessions of judgments, answers, pleas, verdicts of juries, bonds, counterclaims, and, of course, writs (e.g. subpoenas). The covered court cases were primarily civil in nature.

By using these writ and other records in conjunction with extant court minutes, dockets, and other court records, one can gain a more clear and detailed picture of the nature of court proceedings, as well as the activities of one’s ancestors.

Rabun County, Georgia, Writs, 1836 – 1859 is hardcover, 6×9″ with 334 + x pages, with a glossary of legal terms and an every-name and subject index. The cost is $30 plus $3 shipping and handling. Orders postmarked on or before 21 August 2013 receive a $5 discount off the total cost of the book. To order, e-mail me or write to: Dawn Watson, P. O. Box 292, Rabun Gap, GA 30568.

May 3, 2013

Feature Friday: “Will Go By the Hemp Route,” 1896

Source: The Gainesville [GA] Eagle, Thursday, January 2, 1896, page 3, column 2.

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April 29, 2013

Amanuensis Monday: Rosetta Darnell et al. to M. B. Darnell, 15 June 1921

This deed ties together at least three generations of Darnells in Rabun County, from Harrison Darnell to his children to many of his grandchildren.

Source: Rabun County, Georgia, Deed Record B-2: 379-80; Clerk of the Superior Court, Clayton.

Please note that I’ve only transcribed the indenture itself. There were other supporting documents recorded after that, many of which gave the physical localities of Harrison’s descendants.

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April 23, 2013

Tombstone Tuesday: Other Stonecypher Markers, Stonecypher Cemetery, Rabun Co., GA

These markers are located next to William and Malissa V. Stonecypher’s graves on the far side of the cemetery from the parking area. For directions and information on William and Malissa’s markes, see Cemetery Sunday: Stonecypher Cemetery, Rabun Co., GA.

These three stones mark the graves of five infants, all children of V. T. and L. J. Stonecypher.

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April 21, 2013

Cemetery Sunday: Stonecypher Cemetery, Rabun Co., GA

Today for your reading pleasure, we have a cemetery that can be visited in a regular car.

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February 8, 2013

Feature Friday: Tiger Topics, 1898

From the 17 February 1898 issue of The Tallulah Falls Spray (Volume 2, Number 29, front page).

Tiger Topics.

Rev. George Seay is now selling Bibles. If you need a good one see him.

Miss Elsie Ramey has returned from a visit to Mrs. Bob Deneys.

Walter Taylor has returned from a trip to Toccoa.

Rev. Mr. Ella will preach at Tiger’s Baptist church Friday night before the fourth Sunday.

Mr. Sport Ramie of Tiger is teaching school in “Germany.”

Col. Robt. Hamby made an appreciated speech to our school last Friday, and here we will state that we are having a good school, and in the person of Prof. H. C. McCrackin we have a good teacher.

Mr. J. H. Hunnicutt has returned from a visit to North Carolina.

We are glad to see Mr. Bell McCrackin, of South Carolina, in old Rabun once more.

January 29, 2013

Tombstone Tuesday: Joseph Pinson, 1754 – 1838

The marker of Joseph Pinson, Pinson Cemetery, Rabun County, Georgia.

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January 24, 2013

The Darnell-Teague Connection

Harrison Darnell was my great-great-great-great grandfather. He was born by his own statement on 15 April 1815 in Wilkes County, North Carolina.1 His mother was Catherine Darnell,2 a somewhat mysterious woman who moved her small family from Wilkes County, North Carolina, to first Spartanburg District and then Pickens District, South Carolina, before settling finally in Rabun County, Georgia.

Harrison was supposedly the son of Catharine’s first husband, whose name is unknown. She married second to a Darnell, whose name Harrison took, and then a third time to Benjamin Grist, a veteran of the Revolutionary War who was himself a widower. Of these suppositions, the only one that has thus far been documented is Catherine’s marriage to Benjamin Grist, which took place on 2 April 1834 in Pickens District, South Carolina.3

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January 5, 2013

William Hamby’s Estate in Rabun County’s Writs

While compiling Rabun County’s earliest writs and petitions for publication (available soon), I came across an 1843 court case between the heirs of the estate of William Hamby and the administrator of the estate, James Hamby. Naturally, the petition named all the heirs “to the second degree”: Ezekiel Hamby; Jonothan Roach and his wife, Huldah (Hamby) Roach; Benjamin Shelton and his wife, Keziah (Hamby) Shelton; Daniel Inman and his wife, Rebecca (Hamby) Inman; Martha Hamby; Sophia Hamby; Martha Hamby, the mother of William Hamby, the decedent; Amos Forrister and his wife Elizabeth (Hamby) Forester; James Hamby, the estate’s administrator; and Thomas K. Forrister and his wife, Polly (Hamby) Forrister.

The initial petition provides excellent information on the dynamics of this Hamby family, but there are many other documents attached to this suit, including an inventory of the estate, the sale of personal property from the estate, and the deceased’s account books,1 all of which were written into the record.2 The latter two items should be of particular interest to area researchers, even those uninterested in the Hamby family per se, because they can be used to reconstruct William Hamby’s neighborhood.

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