Posts tagged ‘Jackson County North Carolina’

January 24, 2013

The Darnell-Teague Connection

Harrison Darnell was my great-great-great-great grandfather. He was born by his own statement on 15 April 1815 in Wilkes County, North Carolina.1 His mother was Catherine Darnell,2 a somewhat mysterious woman who moved her small family from Wilkes County, North Carolina, to first Spartanburg District and then Pickens District, South Carolina, before settling finally in Rabun County, Georgia.

Harrison was supposedly the son of Catharine’s first husband, whose name is unknown. She married second to a Darnell, whose name Harrison took, and then a third time to Benjamin Grist, a veteran of the Revolutionary War who was himself a widower. Of these suppositions, the only one that has thus far been documented is Catherine’s marriage to Benjamin Grist, which took place on 2 April 1834 in Pickens District, South Carolina.3

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January 20, 2013

A Sunday Walk Around the Blogs

Trust Judy G. Russell to start the week off with a bang. In Monday’s post, O death! Thy name is woman, Judy explores women who received the death penalty in the United States, from colonial times to the last woman executed.

The Knitting Genealogist published a fascinating look at the transformations wrought by the Industrial Revolution in the U. K. and their effects on her ancestors and their communities, “Those infatuated creatures calling themselves Luddites.”

Dave Tabler of Appalachian History writes about the life of Gertrude Dills McKee, a native of Jackson Co., NC, and the first woman to serve in the North Carolina State Senate.

The Rally at the Capitol in support of funding for the Georgia Archives received news coverage from The Clayton Daily News. Don’t forget to write your local representatives to the General Assembly about this important issue.

Well, we almost got snow here. I think a few parts north of us did, so here are some snow day recipes from Alison Murray at North Carolina Miscellany for y’all.

As an aside, my mother used to make snow cream for us using snow, milk, sugar, and vanilla. Yum. Now, if we could just have some actual snow…

March 23, 2012

Feature Friday: Two Marriages from the Franklin Observer, 16 March 1860

The following two marriages were extracted from The Franklin Observer, published in Macon Co., NC, and edited by C. D. Smith and L. F. Siler. Only two issues of The Observer are known to be extant: the March 16, 1860 issue, held at the Duke University Library in Durham; and the June 22, 1860 issue, held at the University of North Carolina Library at Chapel Hill.

Both marriages were taken from the March 16, 1860 issue (Vol. 1, No. 34). The first marriage deals with the first licensed marriage among the Cherokee East.

Married, On the Raven Fork of Oconalufta, in Jackson county, on the 17th of February, by Rev. W. W. Smith, John Ool-stoo-ih to Gin-she, grand-daughter of Standing Wolf. The ceremony was interpreted to the parties by Jefferson Hornbuckle.

This marriage may be worth of note from the fact that it is the first licensed marriage that has ever been solemnized among the Cherokees East. Under an Ordinance passed some months since, by a full council of the nation, a marriage to be made legal, must be licensed by a native Clerk, appointed for that purpose. This is the first marriage under it. The same ordinance abolished bigamy.

The second marriage was a little more run of the mill.

[Married] On the 11th of March, 1860, by M. Rhodes, Esq., Mr. Jackson Frady to Miss Caroline Scroggs, all of Macon county.

I apologize for not including page and column numbers. I transcribed the two issues for inclusion in a genealogical society publication, but the editor and I could not agree on terms. (He wanted me to place the surnames in all caps. I refused, politely.)

These issues are available on microfilm, for those interested.

November 15, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: Elizabeth Alexander Watson and Lavina Jane Watson

Elizabeth Alexander
wife of
James Watson
1833 – 1865
Our loved one

Lavina Jane
Watson
1864 – 1865
Asleep in Jesus

Elizabeth and Lavina were buried in the Alexander Family Cemetery, also known as the Salem Cemetery, in modern Oconee Co., SC.

Elizabeth (Alexander) Watson’s life was, in some ways, tragic. According to family lore, she had just birthed her fourth child, Lavina, when her husband James Watson, his father Moses, and possibly some of James’ brothers were murdered by the Hoopers in the infamous Watson-Hooper feud of Jackson Co., NC. Elizabeth and James’ two eldest children, Daniel and James, watched the lynching from the woods near the home where Elizabeth was lying in, recovering from child birth.

Soon afterwards, Elizabeth took her four children back to then Pickens Dist., SC, to the home of her parents, Daniel and Levina Alexander. Neither Elizabeth nor Lavina survived long after their journey. Elizabeth and James’ remaining three children (Daniel, James, and Elizabeth) were raised by Elizabeth’s family.

November 9, 2011

Newspaper Clippings: Sgt. Thad J. Watson and Sgt. Clarence E. Fisher

These clippings were passed down to me in an envelope containing a letter informing my grandfather’s family that he was missing in action. There are no notes explaining which newspaper these were taken from, nor the date of publication. It is probable that these were clipped from the newspaper published in Jackson Co., NC, where Daddy Thad’s family and the Fisher family lived.

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October 25, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: Etha Mae Watson, Norton Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC

Etha Mae Roberts was born in 25 June 1886 in Jackson Co., GA, the daughter of Alsa and Sally Morgan Roberts. She married first to Elbert Hudson, and second to James “Woodfin” Watson. She died 1 February 1958 in Jackson Co., NC. This was Daddy Thad‘s mother, my father’s grandmother (and my great-grandmother), who was known as Grandma Watson to the younguns.

November 10, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday: Daniel D. and Levina Alexander

Daniel D. Alexander Sr., Born Aug. 29, 1803, Died Nov. 10, 1853
Levina wife of Daniel D. Alexander, Sr., Born Oct. 10, 1805, Died Jan. 2, 1880

Daniel D. Alexander, Sr., and his wife, Levina, were the parents of my ancestress, Elizabeth Alexander (1833 – 1865), who married James Watson, a participant in and casualty of the Watson-Hooper feud of Jackson County, NC. They are buried in the Salem Cemetery, more commonly known as the Alexander Cemetery, in Oconee County, SC (see reference number C003 on the linked web site).

At one time, the stones stood as individual markers. After Daniel’s broke, a thoughtful descendant had the two placed in a larger monument and reset atop the burial sites. A close-up makes the dates easier to read:

Daniel was the son of Micajah and Elizabeth Lewis Alexander. Levina was the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Kennemore Rice. Peggy Burton Rich has compiled a great deal of information on this particular Alexander family in a series of books, the first of which is entitled The Alexander Families of Upper South Carolina.

September 20, 2009

OBCGS Annual Workshop A Rousing Success

Yesterday, I was priviliged to be able to attend the Old Buncombe County Genealogical Society‘s annual Fall workshop. This year’s speakers were archivists and librarians from Western North Carolina colleges and universities, with one speaker who holds an archivist position at both a college and a private high school. Each shared information on his or her institute’s genealogical and historical holdings, particularly within the Special Collections. The speakers and their respective school were as follows:

1. Dr. Karen Paar, Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, Madison Co., NC
2. Dr. Helen Wykle, University of North Carolina, Asheville, Asheville, Buncombe Co., NC
3. Kathy Staley, Appalachian State University, Boone, Watauga Co., NC
4. Diana R. Sanderson, Warren Wilson College and Asheville School, Asheville
5. George Frizzell, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, Jackson Co., NC

The collections described were remarkable; I will be making future posts on each institute.

The workshop itself was well-organized, and well-attended by a good group of researchers. It was held in the current OBCGS library, located on 128 Bingham Road in Asheville. Topics for next year’s workshop are now being considered, and I look forward to attending it next September.

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