Posts tagged ‘Habersham County Georgia’

January 4, 2013

Feature Friday: The Life and Times of C. J. Crunkleton

I keep waiting for someone to ask me why I included all the local and regional news in my book on Rabun County’s earliest newspapers, instead of only the obituaries and death notices as many compilers do.

No one’s asked, but I think it’s an important question, and my answer is this: Newspapers are, in and of themselves, an important resource outside of the fact that they can serve as a substitute for vital and court records. To demonstrate this, let’s look at excerpts from early issues of The Clayton Tribune and The Tallulah Falls Spray pertaining to a gentleman named C. J. Crunkleton.

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June 8, 2012

Feature Friday: A Good Joke, 1882

From the 11 January 1882 issue (Vol. 2, No. 51) of the The Advertiser, published in Clarkesville, Habersham Co., GA.

A Good Joke.

It is related of the Rev. Edward L. Stephens that as he was on his way to one of his appointments he was accosted by a young man who had recently been elected to the office of Justice of the peace, and who thought himself a very important personage. He said:

“Mr. Stephens, why do not you ministers of the present day follow the example of your Saviour more closely? We read of him riding to his appointments on asses.”

“Well,’ said Mr. S., “I will tell you. At this day and time, there are so many asses elected J. P. that we find it impossible to get one to ride.”

The J. P. had no more to say, and from this day wisely avoided all controversy on that subject.

June 1, 2012

Feature Friday: The Negro Exodus, 1882

The following item was found in the 4 January 1882 issue (Vol. 2, No. 50) of the The Advertiser, published in Clarkesville, Habersham Co., GA.

The Negro Exodus.

The Atlanta Post-Appeal says that on the 28th December between five and six hundred negroes from Edgefield county, South Carolina, passed through Atlanta on their way to Arkansas. They are under the leadership of a colored preacher named Hammond who had promised to have a chartered train waiting for them at Augusta, but failed to do so, and the party had to pay full rates to Atlanta. They say they found it too hard to make a living in South Carolina and determined to go elsewhere. Hammond went to Arkansas some time ago and examined the country, and on his return advised the negroes to go out there. It is expected that thousands, altogether, will go.

June 29, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday: The Roberts Family at Cool Springs Methodist Church Cemetery, Habersham Co., GA

A recent trip through the backroads of Habersham County, Georgia, yielded this picture, one of several we took at the Cool Springs Methodist Church Cemetery. In the foreground is a row of stones set in memoriam to Jefferson D. and Sarah J. (Dean) Roberts and several of their kin, immediately behind a Sosebee family plot (the row with the Confederate battle flag). Some distance beyond (in the farther portion of the picture but somewhat in the center) lies Sally Roberts and her husband Thomas Church, who were buried just in front of another Sosebee family plot.

Jefferson D. Roberts, aka John D. Roberts, was the son of John J. and Sarah (Cole) Roberts. J. D.’s brother, William C. Roberts, is buried in the same row of this cemetery (marked by the taller obelisk shaped stone). At the end of the row, near William’s burial spot, is a small stone over the grave of Viander Roberts, son of J. D.’s brother Henry.

What connection Sally (Roberts) Church and the Sosebees have to this family is unknown at this time.

Cool Springs Methodist Church and its cemetery are located off of Highway 17 west of Clarkesville.

July 9, 2009

The Paper of Record

Paper of record is, in short, a term used to define a newspaper that functions as the legal organ of an area; that is, the newspaper is responsible, whether officially or unofficially, for publishing public notices required by law for certain instances, such as rezoning efforts or changes to statute.

For genealogists, the paper of record can be a goldmine of information as it contains legal notices that might be missing from court records, for whatever reason (e.g. the court minutes were destroyed). This includes notices to debtors and creditors for an estate, notice of two parties divorcing, and notice of sheriff’s sales, or any other instance where public notice was required by law.

In Rabun County, the current paper of record is The Clayton Tribune. While the Tribune has been published off and on from 1897 to the present, it wasn’t always the paper of record for Rabun County. During the late 1910s and early 1920s, the Tri-County Advertiser, published in Clarkesville, Habersham County, Georgia, was the paper of record for Rabun County.

Before the Tribune was published, other newspapers served as Rabun County’s legal organ. During the 1850s, the Southern Banner out of Athens, Georgia filled this function. From at least 1878 to the time the Tribune was first published, the Gainesville Eagle, published in Hall County, was the paper of record, although the Clarkesville Advertiser, the Tri-County Advertiser’s precursor, and the Clayton Argus may have been used as the paper of record during the 1890s. Issues of the Tri-County Advertiser, the Gainesville Eagle, and the Clayton Tribune are still on file in the Probate Judge’s office at the county courthouse in Clayton.

A little research into local historical newspapers can yield a great reward for the family historian. Recent efforts to preserve these papers have resulted in the formation of newspaper projects by large universities and state libraries. The University of Georgia’s Georgia Newspaper Project was the first such project I learned of and used. For information on other state historical newspaper collections, see the United States Newspaper Project, courtesy of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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