Posts tagged ‘Buncombe County North Carolina’

March 22, 2012

To My Hopper Kin, re: Samuel and Sarah (McKinney) Hopper

I woke up this morning and decided it was time to put the call out for a book I would like to write in the next two to five years about Samuel and Sarah (McKinney) Hopper, their parents, and their children. I’ve been wanting to do this for a while and decided now’s the time to start getting my ducks in a row.

What I hope to do is to compile enough information on Samuel and Sarah to definitively connect them with their parents and possibly to their grandparents. John M. Dillard has done some research on the McKinneys in connection with his Dillard research, and has linked Sarah to her father Charles McKinney of Buncombe Co., NC. I would like to do much more than that by tracking Charles from his origin points to his death, including determining the true identity of Sarah’s mother, and identifying all of Sarah’s siblings, if possible.

There are several different versions of Samuel’s parents in print and on the Internet, none with good documentation. I believe Samuel may have been connected to the Charles Hopper family of Burke Co., NC, and later Tennessee and other parts west. Proving or disproving that hypothesis will occupy a good deal of time.

So the first part of this hoped-for volume will deal with Samuel, Sarah, and their immediate ancestors. In the next section, I would like to do small biographical sketches of Samuel and Sarah’s children, including the names of their grandchildren. This is the part where I really, really would like help from the descendents of this couple. I would very much like to include pictures of Samuel and Sarah’s children, where they are available. I know a portrait exists for Thomas, my direct ancestor, who died in the Late Troubles. I do not have pictures for any of the other children. Two of the daughters died before the War and I have little hope of finding pictures for them, but for the remainder of the children, I’m crossing my fingers and hoping for the best.

Samuel’s cabin is, I believe, still standing as part of the Hambidge Center property. I would like to include a picture of that, as well as maps and a few select other documents, like estate records and so forth. I would also love to include copies of Bible records, letters, and other important family documents, if such exist. Anyone who is willing to contribute will be gratefully acknowledged.

The scope of the potential volume will be very limited. I do not intend to make this an every-descendant kind of book. Instead, I would like to focus on the individuals named: Samuel, Sarah, their parents (and possibly grandparents), their children and, briefly, their grandchildren. I do not know how long it will take, nor what the final form might be. In this day and age, a printed copy for select libraries and digital copies to interested family members might be the way to go. Who knows?

I would very much like to hear from other family members about this project. Please contact me if you have any information or if you would like to help.

September 20, 2009

OBCGS Annual Workshop A Rousing Success

Yesterday, I was priviliged to be able to attend the Old Buncombe County Genealogical Society‘s annual Fall workshop. This year’s speakers were archivists and librarians from Western North Carolina colleges and universities, with one speaker who holds an archivist position at both a college and a private high school. Each shared information on his or her institute’s genealogical and historical holdings, particularly within the Special Collections. The speakers and their respective school were as follows:

1. Dr. Karen Paar, Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, Madison Co., NC
2. Dr. Helen Wykle, University of North Carolina, Asheville, Asheville, Buncombe Co., NC
3. Kathy Staley, Appalachian State University, Boone, Watauga Co., NC
4. Diana R. Sanderson, Warren Wilson College and Asheville School, Asheville
5. George Frizzell, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, Jackson Co., NC

The collections described were remarkable; I will be making future posts on each institute.

The workshop itself was well-organized, and well-attended by a good group of researchers. It was held in the current OBCGS library, located on 128 Bingham Road in Asheville. Topics for next year’s workshop are now being considered, and I look forward to attending it next September.

June 28, 2009

A Sunday Walk Around the Blogs

Some of my favorite blog articles, web sites, and other genealogy and history goodies from around the Internet for the past week.

Connect Your Tennessee Ancestors to Origins in North Carolina from Arlene Eakle’s Tennessee Genealogy Blog. This article, from one of the Southeastern US’s most prominent genealogists, is an excellent overview of Dr. A. Bruce Pruitt’s extensive work on Tennessee and North Carolina land warrants.

John Chipman of Pittsylvania Co., VA (part 2) from acme nuklear blimp. I was particularly interested in this because of a name that caught my eye near the bottom of the article: one Thos. Dillard witnessed this document. My interest in the Dillard family is two-fold. First, my brother-in-law is a Dillard from nearby Dillard, GA. Secondly, the Dillards were among that group who emigrated from Buncombe Co., NC through Haywood and Macon Counties to Rabun Co., GA and settled in the Little Tennessee River Valley of that county.

It is through the previous blog that I found the next link, the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England, which is exactly what it sounds like, a database of Anglo-Saxons living in England from the “late sixth to the early eleventh century”. Even though I’ll never actually use that database, I found the idea of it incredibly interesting.

April 12, 2009

Priority Surnames

I recently bought several back issues of the NGS NewsMagazine from a fellow researcher, and have been diligently combing through them for research and record tips. I’ve run across some really good finds, too, but the topic of today’s post comes from the article “Charting Your Priorities” by Susan Zacharias (January/February/March 2007, pp. 54 – 56). In short, Zacharias offers a method of prioritizing research by listing end-of-lines (that is, the earliest known generation in every direct line) in various fonts according to their place on the pedigree chart. Your largest font size (Zacharias recommends 18 point) would correspond to your most recent (chronologically) dead end, with each step down in fonts corresponding to one generation further back in time.

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