Archive for October, 2011

October 31, 2011

North Carolina County Records Guide

One of my favorite resources for North Carolina research is the Guide to County Records in the North Carolina State Archives published by the North Carolina Office of Archives and History. The current edition was published in 2009 and constitutes a major update to the previous edition.

After a short introduction, the Guide goes on to describe both original records, bound and loose, and microfilmed records held at the Archives for each of North Carolina’s 100 existing and four defunct counties. The whole is rounded off by a Glossary where one can find short explanations for the various terms used.

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October 28, 2011

Feature Friday: Upper Warwoman, January 20, 1899

One of the most useful features of newspapers from the latter part of the 19th century and well up into the 20th century was the local community column. These items were sent to the editor of the paper by people who lived within the community. Many columns were signed not with the person’s actual name but with a nickname or nom de plume, if they were signed at all. Local columns reflected the comings and goings of citizens, young and old, and generally commented on any number of items important to a community’s residents.

The following is a typical community column from that era, as published in the January 20, 1899 issue of The Clayton Tribune.

Upper Warwoman

Mrs. Fannie Beck has her foot seriously burned.

Miss Lillie Beck is real sick at this writing.

Mr. William Ramey, of Chechero was on Warwoman last week.

Mr. Jeff Beck had the misfortune to get his hand badly cut while butchering a hog last week.

Miss Mary Beck returned home last week.

Eva

* * * * *

Quotation excerpted from my upcoming volume Rabun County, Georgia, Newspapers, 1894 – 1899, expected to be released in 2012.

October 27, 2011

Maw-Maw’s Gingerbread

Gingerbread was one of my mother’s favorite holiday treats, although she seldom cooked it. I think it reminded her too much of her mother, whose recipe this was. I remember my grandmother cooking gingerbread during the winter, but for some reason, I always recall her serving it with a lemon sauce instead of whipped cream. That could be my own addition to the recipe.

Gingerbread
from Ruth (Anderson) Ledford

2 1/2 c. sifted all-purpose flour
1 t. baking soda
1 1/2 t. ginger
1 t. cinnamon
1/2 t. nutmeg
1/4 t. salt
1 c. butter, softened
1 c. sugar (white, granulated)
3 eggs
1 c. light molasses
3/4 c. hot water
Sweetened whipped cream

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Grease well a 13 x 9 1/2 x 2″ pan. Sift flour with soda, salt, and spices; set aside. In a large bowl, mix the butter, sugar, and eggs for five minutes with an electric mixer. At low speed, beat in the molasses and hot water. Add the flour mix, beating just until smooth. Turn batter into pan. Bake on the middle rack for 35 to 40 minutes. Cool partially before serving with whipped cream.

October 26, 2011

Wordless Wednesday: Eugene Jaleniewicz, Crew Member on the Little Lulu

Eugene Jaleniewicz, crew member on the Little Lulu.

October 25, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: Etha Mae Watson, Norton Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC

Etha Mae Roberts was born in 25 June 1886 in Jackson Co., GA, the daughter of Alsa and Sally Morgan Roberts. She married first to Elbert Hudson, and second to James “Woodfin” Watson. She died 1 February 1958 in Jackson Co., NC. This was Daddy Thad‘s mother, my father’s grandmother (and my great-grandmother), who was known as Grandma Watson to the younguns.

October 24, 2011

Who is that Masked Ancestor?

My grandmother told me a story many moons ago about her grandparents. She never mentioned them by name, so I had no clue who she was talking about, but it was the kind of story that tends to stick with you.

If you thought I was going to talk about an ancestor who was a bandit, sorry, but no, I have none that I’m aware of. Same thing for ancestors who were cowboys or bank robbers; nor any who had an overwhelmingly large collection of Halloween costumes. My Uncle Steve worked in a nuclear plant for several years, but I don’t think that’s the same thing at all.

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October 23, 2011

The Suffering of Eugene Beck, 1889

I was tooling around on the Internet looking for information on families from Rabun County when I ran across the blog North to South: Our Family Surnames by Linda Johnson. What interested me in particular was a series of posts she published about Eugene Beck, who murdered his wife and sister-in-law in 1884. So you don’t have to search for them, the three relevant posts (to date) are:

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October 22, 2011

Thomas I. Ledbetter to Amos Curtis, 1863

I’ve been exploring the land records of Rabun County here lately, a difficult undertaking at times because the land records vault is small and is rather popular with attorneys and title searchers. It was relatively uncrowded the day I went, so I was able to snag a couple of records, including the following from Thomas I. Ledbetter to Amos Curtis, and the deeds of gift from Hiram Dillingham to three of his grandchildren.

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October 21, 2011

Feature Friday: Tribune’s Publication Day Changes from Friday to Thursday, January 1899

The Clayton Tribune was first published beginning in January 1898 by J. A. Reynolds, who established the paper and edited it for several years. Until the January 20, 1899 issue, The Tribune was published on Fridays, but beginning with the first issue of the second volume, dated January 26, 1899, Mr. Reynolds moved the publication day to Thursdays.

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October 20, 2011

Hiram Dillingham’s Gifts to Three Grandchildren, 1859

While researching land records in Rabun County for the Dillingham family, I found three deeds of gift from Hiram Dillingham to three grandchildren. Only one of these was listed in the deed record’s index (that is, the index for the volume of deeds in which these were recorded). None were listed in the General Index to Deeds and Mortgages. I found all three by searching the pages before and after the one deed that was indexed. All were dated 23 November 1859, witnessed by Emily Bleckley and James Bleckley, JIC (Justice of the Inferior Court), and were recorded 4 January 1860 in Deed Record F Rabun Co. on pages 53 and 54.

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